Podcasts

Aligning Design With Your Personality

“You can do something special and engaging without stepping out of your brand’s character!”

Whether your first introduction to MailChimp was on Serial (remember Mail Kimp?) or you use it regularly for your organization, this week is all about taking a page from their book to learn how you can use bright and fun visual elements in your marketing and communication — without veering off-brand. For everything from annual reports to public health messages, Beth shares tips on how to use visuals to share information and tell a compelling story that is in line with your organization’s personality. You don’t always need a lot of words to share important information, and Beth shares some of her favorite examples of communications she’s seen that rely on pictures rather than paragraphs. She discusses:

  • Five categories used to describe brand traits and how to identify yours
  • Lessons from MailChimp’s annual report you can use for your own
  • How to use visual elements without being too flashy
  • When it’s beneficial to use graphics and design elements instead of lengthy paragraphs
  • Using visual communication for purposes other than sharing information or communicating instructions
  • And more!

NOTE: Text PERSONALITY1 to 33444

Resources:

MailChimp’s website and annual report

Read Jennifer Aaker’s Dimensions of Brand Personality

USDA’s Choose MyPlate campaign

Kashi infographic about the transition to going organic

Centers for Disease Control infographic illustrating International Health Regulations

Download the TD Bank infographic highlighting its healthcare survey results

Example of Grainger infographic with NASCAR

John Deere infographic about their products

YouTube video: Microsoft Re-Designs the iPod Packaging

Sign up for this month’s masterclass: nonprofittoolkit.net/training

 

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Enjoy Driving Participation! If the program is helpful to you, please subscribe in iTunes to have sessions sent to you as they go live. And please consider leaving a review in iTunes as well. Reviews help other organizations find the show and learn from these terrific stories.

 

Podcasts

Recognizing the Duty of Foresight

“I think in many ways the consistent practice of foresight is crucial so it’s not a one off thing. It’s not something you do occasionally. It’s something you’re doing all the time. It has to become sort of a central focus of how the board is devoting its attention.” — Jeff De Cagna, Foresight First

Jeff DeCagna, executive advisor of Foresight First, joins in to talk about his work in the association community. He emphasizes the importance of recognizing the duty of foresight and using it to build resilience. Of course, he doesn’t mean predicting the future but rather the ability or the choice to look forward. He explains how embracing the idea of foresight can lead to building resilience and help manage risks. They explore the idea of emphasizing governing over governance and how to encourage the people you’re working with to see governing as an active process. He also explains the difference between being a volunteer and being a voluntary contributor, and how the label can change a person’s motivation.

He and Beth explore:

  • Jeff’s definition of foresight and what its benefits are
  • Why Jeff prefers to use “governing” over “governance”
  • How foresight plays a fundamental role in stewardship
  • The difference between competent trust and benevolent trust
  • How can an organization begin to focus on foresight?
  • The difference between director experience and user experience

Resources:

Foresight First website

Jeff’s Chat link: Chat.Center/ForesightFirst

Follow Foresight First on Twitter: @dutyofforesight

 

Podcasts

MLK Day: The Secrets of a Successful Movement

“There is a clear and obvious link between Dr. King’s legacy and encouraging people to engage in community service that breaks down barriers and builds a land where people live in peace, dignity and equality.”

Just a few days ago, thousands across the country observed Martin Luther King Jr. Day. This week on Driving Participation, reflect on the legacy of the civil rights leader and how it can inspire you to effect change in your own community. How did the movement to get involved in community service in his honor begin? Beth takes a look at the holiday’s history and the lessons you can learn from MLK Day for your own work. Revisit past episodes to hear how the work other Driving Participation guests do can inspire you, too! She takes a look at:

  • How MLK Day got started and how it’s grown to the movement it is today
  • How your own organization can organize its own MLK Day of Service effort
  • Getting involved in pre-existing holidays, such as Giving Tuesday or National Wear Red Day…
  • …Or even creating your own holiday!

Resources:

The Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service: mlkdayofservice.org

Corporation for National & Community Service

Giving Tuesday: www.givingtuesday.org

American Heart Association National Wear Red Day

Laurel Hill Cemetery’s Grave Digger’s Ball

Tobi Johnson Session

Jamie MacDonald -Turning Online Events into a Party for your Cause

Session 17 – Abigail Quesinberry The Real Reach of Social Media with Abigail Quesinberry
Session 22 – Justin Ware Manufacturing Viral Campaigns
Session 28 – Kait Sheridan – Starting a Movement and Building Momentum
Session 70 – Sean King – Using #GivingTuesday as a Launchpad for Growing Your Audience
Session 79 – A #GivingTuesday Resource Roundup from our Podcast Guests
Session 83 – Amie Simpson Evolving #GivingTuesday
Session 100 – Karen Bantuveris Engaging Volunteers with a Social Media Buzz Team

Subscribe to Driving Participation in iTunes.
Sign up for our next master class.

Podcasts

Getting People to See and Stay on Your Website

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“When you design for your internal audience instead of your external audience, you get a website that converts well internally.” — Claudia Pennington, CEO of Side Hustle, LLC

Learn the magic of Google this week with digital marketing consultant Claudia Pennington. She joins in to share the secrets to getting the right people to your website — and then staying there. From keywords to the structure of the site itself, Claudia and Beth explore the mindset of a searcher and what you can do to fill those needs. She names her top priorities when assessing a website as well as the trends she thinks will color marketing communications for the next couple of years. With her background in social media, Claudia takes a look at how platforms like Facebook and Twitter are using live video features and how you can make them most effective. She and Beth discuss:

  • What does SEO actually mean?
  • How to make a usability test in order to make your website the most effective
  • Where do you go to learn what people are searching for and what’s bringing traffic to your site?
  • The two trends Claudia predicts will make an impact on marketing communications
  • The number one concern when you are thinking about the structure of a website
  • How search engine optimization is like a plumber

Resources:

Follow Claudia on Twitter: @seoauditguide

Claudia’s website

The Mindset List from Beloit College:

Zoom video conferencing

Google Search Console

 

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Podcasts

Why Does Membership Matter

dianeward_wp“You want them to be active, to participate, to come, spend and enjoy. So that is where the calculations and profile comes in. It’s not department to department, but institutional wide, how is the membership permeating and where is it affecting.” — Diane Ward, Membership Matters

It sounds like a simple question, but there isn’t a simple answer: Why does membership matter? This week, Diane Ward, president of Membership Matters, joins in to share the ins and outs of membership programs, from data collection to evaluating who your members are. Within her work experience, she has learned how people “move in, move up and move out of membership programs.” Members vote with their feet and wallets, she says, so she takes a look at why it’s important to look beyond factors such as revenue and expense equations and focus on what members do for your organization. Members’ visitation and how they engage in one year usually foreshadows their retention in the next year. She and Beth discuss:

  • How Diane recommends dealing with the data attached to understanding memberships and how to focus on what’s most important
  • Why it’s important to evaluate what members do for your organization
  • The two most common measurements people use to evaluate their programs
  • How participation with an organization can serve as a barometer of how active people are
  • What do actions beyond paying membership dues show about about the organization?
  • How to use metrics and technology to build a user profile and how it can help you determine if memberships are working

Resources:

Membership Matters website: www.membership-matters.com

Email Diane: dward@membershipmatters.com

Revisit Adrian Segar’s episode: iriscreative.com/dp126/

 

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Podcasts

What Worked in 2016

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New Year always feels like a fresh start with a clean slate. It’s a great time to look both forward and back. Last year we did a show about looking forward and setting your marketing resolutions for the year ahead.

This year Beth invited our past guests to look back at what they did over the year that helped them grow. They have some great insights and suggestions for you that I think you’ll really enjoy.

In this session, learn what fifteen of our consultant and nonprofit guests did differently — and really worked.

Listen in and get inspired to set your own intentions for what’s next.

 

Highlights from the session:

Consultant Gail Bower paused to reflect on value, brand and messaging

Sarah Hemminger and Allison Buchalter, from Thread created an arc of community events that build thousands of new interactions, connections and press.

Rachel Hutchisson from Blackbaud kept things simple, true and completely core to what she believed on her path to her delivering her first TedX talk.

Steven Screen from the Better Fundraising Company encouraged clients to narrow their fundraising focus to one compelling part of their mission.

Consultant Meredith Low found a cool new tool to capture the ideas that come to her in a flash.

Carol Meerschaert, formerly of the Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association, followed the COPE strategy—create once, publish everywhere.

Vanessa Chase Lockshin from the Storytelling Nonprofit put contingency plans in place so she wouldn’t be stressed out when things go awry.

Adrian Segar from Conferences that Work invented a new process for participation at conferences that had attendees engaged in conversation long
after the session ended.

Candi Summers from Bestwa put her effort into getting as much face time as possible with donors.

For Greg Koch of the Zoo Miami Foundation, taking one step backwards led to taking several steps forwards.

Claire Axelrod from Clairification encouraged her clients to pick up the phone and than donors right away.

Sandy Rees from Get Fully Funded saw a terrific response from donors when they made their newsletter more personable and conversational

John Lepp from Agents of Good shared a formula for personalizing direct mail using the Pareto Principle.

Elizabeth Weaver Engel wants listeners to start a formal program of regular audience conversations.

Jeff Miles looked at what he was doing that was missing the mark with his audience and learned to focus on who they really are to skyrocket donations.

Thanks to our guests for giving us all a boost into the new year and thank you for another year of listening.

 

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Podcasts

The Secret to Happy Email Subscribers

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“When you market only to sell, you miss a critical opportunity to support, educate and bond with your community.”

There is a difference between over-communicating and over-asking, especially when it comes to email marketing and communication. That’s just one theme of this week’s episode. Join Beth as she discusses how to plan your communication strategy ahead for next year as 2016 draws to a close. Instead of worrying about sending too many emails, Beth shares the secret to switching the focus to something that will matter: a relationship with your subscribers. She explains how the year is full of peaks and valleys as far as communication. She shares six tips to fill those valleys so that downtime doesn’t become dead time. Hear about:

  • A step-by-step guide to planning a marketing calendar for next year
  • Tips on engaging your audience based on what you do
  • Mapping out the key dates you need to lead up to every season
  • What kind of content to share with your email subscribers during the “valleys”
  • Why you should sometimes be sharing personal content
  • What is conversion marketing?
  • A new monthly master class on marketing
  • And more!

Resources:

Beth’s blog post on the secret to happy email subscribers

Interview with Anne Samilov on Amy Porterfield’s Online Marketing Made Easy podcast

 

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Podcasts

The Power of Momentum

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“To me, momentum is really catalytic and it just gives us this incredible opportunity to effect change in a good way.” — Dawn Owens, The Link of Cullman County

Everyone has to start somewhere. That’s what Dawn Owens learned when she moved down South to Cullman County, Alabama and started a nonprofit, the Link of Cullman County, after seeing a need for it in her new community. Through talking to one person who led her to another person who pointed her to another person, Dawn got the ball rolling for her organization and built the momentum needed to help it grow. Four years later, she joins Driving Participation to talk about how she got that momentum started and kept it sustained. She talks about a grant contest the Link entered and how she used Facebook Live to create interest and engagement around the project — even to those who had never had any interaction with the organization before. She and Beth explore:

  • How just one conversation can build the momentum you need to get started
  • The benefits of using Facebook Live
  • How she was able to pinpoint a need in her community and respond to it
  • How the Link was able to spread their message to a younger generation in an accessible way
  • Why it’s important to focus on using social media that will best suit your experience and your organization
  • Why it’s crucial that you’re willing to shift to what your audience’s needs are and not just model what you do based on other organization’s tactics

Resources:

The Link of Cullman County website: linkingcullman.org

Like the Link on Facebook

Follow the Link on Twitter: @LinkingCullman

Follow Dawn on Twitter: @DawnMarieOwens

Follow the Link on Instagram: @LinkingCullman

Send Dawn an email: dawnowens@linkingcullman.org

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Podcasts

Embracing New Media — Even at 800 Years Old

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“The challenge is just moving them from looking at new media as something we don’t do, quote unquote, to seeing it as a strategic solution to an existing problem.” — Bill Skowronski, Dominican Friars Central Province

How do you teach an 800-year-old organization to use social media? This week on Driving Participation, Bill Skowronski, director of marketing for the Central Dominican Friars and founder of Constellation, joins in to talk about how he has helped an old organization see the benefits of using new media — especially when some people involved have never used those tools before. For Bill, it comes down to strategy. Using storytelling methods and social media tools that work specifically for the organization, Bill has helped the Dominican Friars gain a larger following on social media and embrace tools they hadn’t used before. He and Beth talk about creating content that appeals to a very specific audience and thinking about the services you offer in terms of what the world needs from your organization. They discuss:

  • The difference between “earned media” and “owned media”
  • Understanding the strategic value of social media
  • How they created a weekly video series that gets people excited for Mass (!)
  • How to look at your efforts in terms of what your audience needs from you rather than what you want to give to them
  • Why it’s important to focus on the medium that best suits you and your organization in order to communicate most effectively
  • Why Bill advises to prioritize “outcomes over output”
  • How Pope Francis’s Twitter presence affected the Dominican Friars

Resources:

Dominican Friars Central Province website: www.opcentral.org

Constellation website: www.sharingthegood.org

Follow Bill on Twitter: @BillSkowronski

Follow the Dominican Friars on Twitter: @OPDomCentral

Follow Constellation on Twitter: @SharingtheGood

 

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Podcasts

Developing Your Audience Focus

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“We’re not just trying to throw things out to the community and see what response we get. What we’re trying to really do is dissect where people want to be involved with our organization and then have that bubble up to the top so that they see that in an engaging way.” — Jeff Miles, Keystone Opportunity Center

Jeff Miles has used his background in sales and marketing to find new approaches in fundraising as development and marketing director of the Keystone Opportunity Center. On Driving Participation, he joins Beth to talk about how he has been able to uncover Keystone’s core audience. For instance, by tracking who has given multiple donations of $125, he found that the majority of its givers tend to be women in their 40s to 60s. With that information, he has been able to share stories and statistics and create tailor-made campaigns that appeal directly to them. He shares tips on how you can sharpen your focus on the audience that will care the most. They discuss creating “gateway points” for the community to get involved and more. They explore:  

  • How past experience in sales — like selling hot tubs — gave Jeff experience and skills he could use in his nonprofit work
  • Why you will benefit tremendously if “your product or your organization connects well with mothers”
  • Why writing your newsletter as though you’re writing to a friend makes a difference
  • How to use specific examples to galvanize your audience to get involved
  • Why targeting a specific group is more effective than a “shotgun” approach where your message can get lost in the shuffle
  • Why local radio stations are a good source to learn more about demographics that could become supporters of your organization
  • How to get people “bubbling over with excitement” about your organization

Resources:

Keystone’s website: keystoneopportunity.org

Email Jeff: JMiles@KeystoneOpp.org

Information about AFP Greater Philadelphia’s Principles of Fundraising course

 

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Enjoy Driving Participation! If the program is helpful to you, please subscribe in iTunes to have sessions sent to you as they go live. And please consider leaving a review in iTunes as well. Reviews help other organizations find the show and learn from these terrific stories.

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